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dc.contributor.authorMcGinnis, Lee; Gentry, James W.en_US
dc.dateAugust 2005en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-14en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-02T14:38:05Z
dc.date.available2014-11-14en_US
dc.date.available2018-11-02T14:38:05Z
dc.identifier.otherSchool of Business Working Paper Series; No. 52en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://wuir.washburn.edu/handle/10425/178
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines how people become participants in a ritual that has historically been dominated by people outside their group. We first demonstrate how participatory golf is a ritual, that there is apprehension when entering this ritual, and that there are differences in how people respond to rituals based upon experience. Ritual negotiation and apprehension is especially prevalent among female beginners, who are less privy to golf's rituals. The level of perceived sacredness influences the relationships found in this study. Qualitative data indicates that women use three different modes for ritual participation: be subservient to them, challenge them, or ignore them.en_US
dc.format.mediumPDFen_US
dc.language.isoEngen_US
dc.publisherWashburn University, School of Businessen_US
dc.subjectIndustrial psychologyen_US
dc.subjectGolfen_US
dc.titleNegotiating Ritual Participation: Experiencing Ritual Gifts as an Outsideren_US
dc.typeWorking paperen_US
washburn.identifier.cdm114en_US
washburn.identifier.oclc63542472en_US
washburn.source.locationen_US


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