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dc.contributor.authorIrons, Robert; Weigand, Robert A.en_US
dc.dateAugust 2007en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-14en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-02T14:38:14Z
dc.date.available2014-11-14en_US
dc.date.available2018-11-02T14:38:14Z
dc.identifier.otherSchool of Business Working Paper Series; No. 88en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://wuir.washburn.edu/handle/10425/227
dc.description.abstractWe examine the effect of the withdrawal sequencing decision on the longevity of retirees' portfolios by comparing the strategy of consuming bond assets first with maintaining a 50/50 stock/bond portfolio and consuming stock assets first. Using a long time series of data, we find that consuming bonds first consistently extends investor portfolios, although in about ten percent of the cases the strategy does not outperform the other methods. We also identify a market signal that effectively predicts when a bonds-first strategy will produce the largest gains. Based on current values of the signal, it appears that retirees in 2007 should be cautious about consuming bond assets first, as the strategy is currently unlikely to result in the same extension of portfolio longevity as it has historically.en_US
dc.format.mediumPDFen_US
dc.language.isoEngen_US
dc.publisherWashburn University, School of Businessen_US
dc.subjectPortfolio longevityen_US
dc.subjectPortfolio managementen_US
dc.subjectRetirement planningen_US
dc.subjectWithdrawal sequencingen_US
dc.titleHow Withdrawal Sequence Affects The Longevity And Risk of Retirees Portfolios: Additional Evidenceen_US
dc.typeWorking paperen_US
washburn.identifier.cdm159en_US
washburn.identifier.oclc235273038en_US
washburn.source.locationen_US


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