Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLivgren, Rebecca
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-23T18:32:43Z
dc.date.available2021-06-23T18:32:43Z
dc.date.issued2021-04-15
dc.identifier.urihttps://wuir.washburn.edu/handle/10425/2515
dc.description.abstractAlthough male rape victims’ underreporting may be partly due to fear of victim blaming and other negative social outcomes, friendship may provide a buffer. We examined friendship’s effect on male rape victim blame, and whether just world beliefs, invulnerability feelings, and attributional style mediated this effect. Participants were randomly assigned to imagine they were best friends (n = 64), an acquaintance (n = 74), or a stranger (n = 65) with a male rape victim in a vignette. They completed self-report measures that quantified the three potentially mediating variables. Correlational, ANCOVA, and mediation analyses indicated no effects of condition, but valuable predictive utility of the mediators. Victim blame was generally low across all three conditions. Implications for providing the most effective social support of male rape victims are offered.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWashburn Universityen_US
dc.subjectResearch Subject Categories::SOCIAL SCIENCES::Social sciences::Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectMale rape victimsen_US
dc.subjectFriendshipen_US
dc.titleMediating the Effects of Friendship on Male Rape Victim Blameen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record