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dc.contributor.authorRoach, Billen_US
dc.dateJanuary 2005en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-19en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-02T14:38:36Z
dc.date.available2018-01-19en_US
dc.date.available2018-11-02T14:38:36Z
dc.identifier.otherSchool of Business Working Paper Series; No. 37en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://wuir.washburn.edu/handle/10425/310
dc.description.abstractThis paper speculates on how the Economic Order Quantity (EOQ) formula was developed. These speculations are interesting and useful for several reasons: 1.) The speculations help scholars understand the creative process and perhaps to teach in a way that enhances the creativity of our students, 2.)They help us better understand how much mathematics our students need to understand the rest of the curriculum, 3.)They bring us in contact with a "beautiful mind," and 4.)They illustrate some of the ambiguities inherent in trying to use citations to give appropriate credit for ideas. This paper describes the manner in which Ford Whitman Harris developed the EOQ model from Kelvin's Law, a law describing the costs of an electrical transmission system.en_US
dc.format.mediumPDFen_US
dc.language.isoEngen_US
dc.publisherWashburn University, School of Businessen_US
dc.subjectEOQen_US
dc.subjectEconomic Order Quanittyen_US
dc.subjectFord Whitman Harrisen_US
dc.subjectPurchasingen_US
dc.subjectKelvin's Lawen_US
dc.titleOrigins of the Economic Order Quantity Formulaen_US
dc.typeWorking paperen_US
washburn.identifier.cdm234en_US
washburn.identifier.oclc61521690en_US
washburn.source.locationen_US


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