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dc.contributor.authorWalker, Rosemary; Ball, Jenniferen_US
dc.dateDecember 2003en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-10en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-02T14:38:37Z
dc.date.available2014-11-10en_US
dc.date.available2018-11-02T14:38:37Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://wuir.washburn.edu/handle/10425/312
dc.description.abstractLabor force studies have confirmed that women who have more education are more likely to participate in the labor force. However, whether women work because they have more education, or women pursue education because they expect to participate in the labor force, is still at issue. In this paper, we explore whether the causality runs from employment to higher education, from education to employment, or both directions. Our findings, using the Granger and Geweke causality methods, illustrate that the percnetage of women receiving a college education increases the percentage of the labor force that is female.en_US
dc.format.mediumPDFen_US
dc.language.isoEngen_US
dc.publisherWashburn University, School of Businessen_US
dc.subjectWomen - Employmenten_US
dc.subjectLabor supplyen_US
dc.subjectEconomics of genderen_US
dc.subjectDemographicsen_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.titleCausality of Women's Labor Force Participation and Educationen_US
dc.typeWorking paperen_US
washburn.identifier.cdm25en_US
washburn.identifier.oclc61501550en_US
washburn.source.locationen_US


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